Pad Work

Fast or slow, hard or soft, linear or circular, standing up or on the ground... talk about body mechanics and the fine motor skills you need to develop to become an effective fighter...

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Pad Work

Postby sansoofighter » Wed Feb 23, 2011 9:43 pm

What are your thoughts on Kung-Fu San Soo practitioners spending too much time on technique, and not enough time on pad work? Pad work meaning: punching drills and kicking drills. I understand we can do them on our own, but I think it needs to be more involved in the schools, for the students' benefit.
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Pad Work

Postby San Soo Sifu » Wed Feb 23, 2011 10:55 pm

Yeah, I make my students (and myself) do pad work together. Our classes our 90 minutes long. The first 30 minutes is nothing but the usual Kung-Fu San Soo drills, i.e. Horse Stances, Windmills, Break Falls, Forward Rolls, etc.

Plus, the last 10 minutes of those 30 minutes is pad work. (So, actually our San Soo drills are the first 20 minutes.)

But, I take two approaches for pad work on the same night.

1. We work on a very specific punch or kick all week long. For example, we might be working on the roundhouse kick. Day one, we might be working it using the ball of the foot and kicking a kicking paddle (or focus glove/mitt). Day two, we might be working it using the instep of the foot and kicking an air shield (or foam shield). Day three, we might be working it using the shin bone and kicking Muay Thai pads.

2. I will cherry pick a strike out of THAT night's lesson, and work it on some type of bag/pad work. I might pick a down hammer to the collar bone; I might pick a back hand to the nose; I might pick a roundhouse punch to the kidney; I might pick a stomp to the foot's instep/toes; I might pick a knee to the groin, etc. I try to pick a training bag/pad that will gives us the best angle and most force used to approximate how the strike will be done within THAT night's lesson.

I find this helps my student's gain a deeper level of understanding of THAT night's lesson; as well as to help them separate fantasy from reality.
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Pad Work

Postby sansoofighter » Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:03 pm

That is nice to hear that some Kung-Fu San Soo schools still do pad work. The school I train at now, we do zero pad work, just technique after technique; and that can get kind of boring and routine sometimes. At my previous school, we did a lot of everything, which I believe you should. I kind of feel sorry for some of the guys that train at my new school; it is like they are play fighting, and not taking it serious; and they have no idea how it feels to make any contact, at all.
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Pad Work

Postby San Soo Sifu » Fri Apr 04, 2014 9:49 am

Pads, mitts, gloves, shields, bags, etc., have 3 levels of training...

1. Holding it stationary for the beginning student to learn structure, form, technique behind the particular punch, kick, or strike. This is both to teach the punch, kick, or strike; and also to give the new student confidence in themself.

2. Moving with the training bag, i.e. circling left, circling right, advancing forward, and retreating backward. Providing a moving target for the intermediate student to strike with proper timing, distance, precision, and power.

3. All of the above with the added element of slapping the face with focus gloves, jamming up a kicking technique with an air/foam shield, (or even have a second student or another trainer come up from behind and apply a rear naked choke, or some other type of hold, etc.; read the following post right here on T.T. & A.S.S. for further details... viewtopic.php?f=21&t=635 ). This is for the advanced student to slip, duck, bob & weave, evade a counter-strike or counter-move; and also to realize that the other guy is going to throw some chaos into the advanced student's striking combinations. Another step in upping the pressure.

If the student hasn't trained sequentially as above, then discussing live sparring is a moot point.
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Isolating uppercut punches; adding footwork.

Postby San Soo Sifu » Wed Jun 25, 2014 12:15 pm

Working with a beginner: beginners deserve huge credit for just showing up, at this point in their training. It is a joy to have new students who are hungry to train, and thirsty to learn.

Do you have an uppercut punching bag in your gym? If not, maybe an hour-glass shaped punching bag, or a tear-drop shaped punching bag?

With a beginner who wants to learn, and is teachable; I would start them out isolating the uppercut punches on the bag. Focus on punching mechanics first. Do this for a while. Take a break, and move them into the "ring" (mat, or workout area, away from the punching bag). Now, isolate their footwork with them holding up their fists in the position you want their on-guard, cover up. You lead the dance. You get them to move their feet how you want them to step by reacting to your movement and your footwork. Take another break.

Back to punching. Start working the various angles on the uppercut punch you want them to work, keeping an eye on their mechanics and technique. Now, back to the ring for some more dancing lessons with you leading the dance.

After repeating this isolating process however many times as you feel is necessary for you to have had a critical eye on their footwork separately, and their uppercut punching mechanics separately, now it is time to merge them together.

Now, put the footwork and uppercut punching skills together, with you holding focus gloves (focus mitts, focus pads).
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San Soo Pad Work

Postby Dedicated Villain » Mon Aug 07, 2017 12:46 am

We all love hitting the pads; however, I have noticed that many traditional martial artists, when striking the pads, end up looking like sloppy kick boxing. How to avoid this, without being too rigid; and yet still being fluid, while staying true to the art?
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Re: Pad Work

Postby Timothy » Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:27 pm

Pad work teaches range control, technique, power, ferocity and targets but bag work and pad work are limited. Freestyle is absolute to training. You can and should get all the same from freestyle and forms. Freestyle is one of the secrets to San Soo. Two forms exist. One to train techniques and the other to test and fight. The latter is harder but worth every second. You will get hurt, broken bones, get knocked out. But always should be practiced with respect and kindness.I will fight anyone once maybe twice, and that's the benefit to learning real San Soo. San Soo is real if you have the Ghost or have heard of him then you know. The spectre is real, I don't know his name but he comes from ancient times, maybe he's the magician. Or so he tells me, I've met him, he's my friend.
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Re: Pad Work

Postby Dedicated Villain » Tue Aug 08, 2017 6:57 am

Timothy wrote:Pad work teaches range control, technique, power, ferocity and targets but bag work and pad work are limited. Freestyle is absolute to training. You can and should get all the same from freestyle and forms. Freestyle is one of the secrets to San Soo. Two forms exist. One to train techniques and the other to test and fight. The latter is harder but worth every second. You will get hurt, broken bones, get knocked out. But always should be practiced with respect and kindness.I will fight anyone once maybe twice, and that's the benefit to learning real San Soo. San Soo is real if you have the Ghost or have heard of him then you know. The spectre is real, I don't know his name but he comes from ancient times, maybe he's the magician. Or so he tells me, I've met him, he's my friend.


Ghost? This some inside joke I'm not getting?
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