Brachial Plexus

Discuss the medical implications and realities of close quarters combat as it relates to human anatomy and physiology.

Moderator: San Soo Sifu

Brachial Plexus

Postby San Soo Sifu » Sat Apr 12, 2014 3:21 am

Dave Lorenson wrote:From: Sifu Dave
To: All
8/15/01

Target: Brachial Plexus

Effective Strikes:
Hammer Blows
Open Hand Chops
One-Knuckle Punches
Two-Finger Jabs
Three-Finger Spears (Four-Finger Spears)
Five-Finger Tip Cupped Bunches (Crane's Beak or Chicken Peck)

Anatomy:
The Brachial Plexus is composed of a network of nerves originating in the spine, and is located in the shoulder region from the neck to the axilla (armpit). It is composed of the last 4 cervical, and the first thoracic nerves out of which emerges smaller nerves that are more descriptive as to location. The nerves that emerge from the plexus are as follows (with the area supplied in parentheses):

Suprascapular (superficial muscles of the shoulder blade).

Dorsoscapular (superficial muscles of the shoulder blade).

Thoracic nerves - Medial and Lateral Anterior (Pectoralis Major and Minor - "pecs").

Long thoracic nerve (Serratus Anterior - smaller muscles that lie over the ribs below the "pecs").

Thoracodorsal (Latissimus Dorsi - "lats").

Subscapular (Subscapular and Teres Major - below the shoulder blade).

Axillary or Circumflex (Deltoid and Teres Minor and the skin over the Deltoid).

Musculocutaneous (Muscles of the front of the arm - Biceps Brachii, Coracobrachialis, and Brachialis and the skin on the outer side of the forearm).

Ulnar (muscles of the hand and forearm and sensory supply to parts of the hand).

Median (muscles of the front of the forearm and hand, sensory supply to the skin of parts of the hand).

Radial (Triceps Brachii, muscles of the back of the forearm, sensory supply to the skin of the back of the hand and forearm).

Medial Cutaneous (Sensory supply to the inner surface of the arm and forearm).

Phrenic (Diaghragm). This nerve actually does not originate in the Brachial Plexus, but actually branches away from mostly the 4th cervical nerve before the formation of the plexus, but should be mentioned because of its general proximity.

The Brachial Plexus can be struck where the neck and shoulder join, immediately above the mid-collarbone, or even in part in the axilla (armpit). A finger strike (traditional Dragon's fist, Snake fist, or Cobra strike for those of you who are familiar with the terms) will work very well in the axilla as well as a well placed one-knuckle punch, or even a kick. The hammer blows tend to work better to the collar bone, but the penetration of a curved four-finger spear above, and under, the collar bone is most effective as well. A deep penetrating one-knuckle punch at the juncture will sometimes drop the opponent as will some of the previously mentioned blows.

Patho-physiology: When a nerve center is struck the effect is in relationship to the accuracy of the strike and the force used, as well as to the actual mass and build of the opponent. The nerve reacts to the blow and will (because of the high level of electrical activity and chemical changes) fail to communicate properly with the muscles and render the extremity (right or left arms) useless. The result can be temporary or even permanent (again, depending on the damage).
Pain is definitely a consideration here and someone with a low tolerance to pain will have an arm rendered useless with a less powerful blow, because of the intensity of the pain caused.
Hit First...Hit Hard...Hit Often...and Finish Him Off!
User avatar
San Soo Sifu
 
Posts: 1600
Joined: Sun Jun 03, 2007 5:44 pm
Location: Salem, Oregon, USA

Re: Brachial Plexus

Postby San Soo Sifu » Sat Apr 12, 2014 3:30 am

San Soo Sifu wrote:From: San Soo Sifu
To: Sifu Dave
8/19/01

A "move" that I have found to be useful (kind of difficult to describe on the Internet, but I will do my best) is...

If people are familiar with the original Star Trek series, and when Mr. Spock would do his "Vulcan grip" from behind...

Well, from the front side facing your opponent (not behind your opponent), dig your thumb into the space (hollow) right above his collar bone (next to his neck), with your four fingers wrapped around and behind, and digging into the back of his trapezius muscle, I have found this move to cause excruciating pain to your opponent, and a great little friendly "persuader." Your thumb is digging into the Brachial Plexus area (a point of it, anyway).

Now combine this "move" using, say your left hand (to his right side shoulder Brachial Plexus area), and use your right hand to use your thumb across the bridge of his nose (leveraging down) attempting to crush his nose, and your four fingers digging into the bottom side of his left jaw line (leveraging up).

With these two pressure points combined, you can leverage (force) your opponent downwards, either squatting down, or down to one or both of his knees; and you bring your knee up, and strike him up into his throat as he is lowering his body weight downwards.

When I imagine the Hoi Ga (family), I imagine that they were great contributors of pressure point (and pass point) knowledge; and using what some styles of Kung-Fu would call "Eagle Claw" techniques.
Hit First...Hit Hard...Hit Often...and Finish Him Off!
User avatar
San Soo Sifu
 
Posts: 1600
Joined: Sun Jun 03, 2007 5:44 pm
Location: Salem, Oregon, USA

Re: Brachial Plexus

Postby San Soo Sifu » Sat Apr 12, 2014 3:44 am

Dave Lorenson wrote:From: Sifu Dave
To: San Soo Sifu
8/20/01

Thank you San Soo Sifu,
Great thoughts, and very effective, I might add!
Hit First...Hit Hard...Hit Often...and Finish Him Off!
User avatar
San Soo Sifu
 
Posts: 1600
Joined: Sun Jun 03, 2007 5:44 pm
Location: Salem, Oregon, USA


Return to Anatomy and Physiology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron